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Artistic reconstruction of the Seiche wave surging into the Tanis river, bringing in fishes and everything in its path while impact spherules rain down from the sky. (Artistic reconstruction: Joschua Knüppe)
23/02/2022

Reign of the dinosaurs ended in spring

post by
Reinout Verbeke

An international team of researchers has discovered that the asteroid that wiped out almost all the dinosaurs came down in spring. This is indicated by the growth and feeding patterns of fish that died immediately after the impact.

Skeleton of a cave hyena cub (composed of bones of several individuals) from the Cavern Marie-Jeanne (Photo: Thierry Hubin, RBINS)
02/02/2022

Skeletons of hundreds of Ice Age hyena cubs found in Belgian cave highlight severe ecological event that struck northern Europe about 45,000 years ago

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences and the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, have recovered more than 300 skeletons of cave hyena cubs from a prehistoric cave in southern Belgium.

A 'hunched' male O. gibbosus spider. (Photo: Gilbert Loos, ARABEL-image bank)
23/12/2021

Supergene turns spider into a ‘macho male’

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Biologists from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences found in a spider species that 'macho males' have an extra set of genes that is lacking in feminized males.

Kryptobaatar sp. from the Upper Cretaceous of Bayan Mandahu. (Photo: RBINS)
02/12/2021

Two primitive mammals that lived at the end of the dinosaur era

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Palaeontologists from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences have described two primitive mammals from the Upper Cretaceous that lived about 70 million years ago. One was excavated in Inner Mongolia, the other in Romania.

Marine mammals in the Paratethys Sea, which became hypersaline between 13.8 and 13.4 million years ago, developed heavier bones. The core of the bone has far fewer cavities compared to contemporaries from other seas and to current species. (Image: RBINS)
23/11/2021

Marine mammals developed thicker bones as diving weights in super salty sea

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Palaeontologists have discovered that marine mammals developed thicker and heavier bones as an adaptation to a salty inland sea in Central Europe some 13 million years ago.

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