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Collection of skulls from the medieval Coxyde abbey cemetery. (Photo: RBINS)
01/12/2020

Researchers to make an inventory of human remains in the Belgian collections

post by
Reinout Verbeke

A team of researchers coordinated by the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS) are carrying out a survey to make an inventory of human remains in Belgian museums, research institutes and private collections, which will include human remains from colonial times.

Visiting the museum virtually through the Google Arts and Culture platform.
02/11/2020

Bringing Nature Into Lockdowned Lives: #NaturalsciencesAtHome

post by
Reinout Verbeke

If you can’t come to our Museum, we have to bring the Museum to your living room! Here’s an update of what we have posted on our social media with #NaturalsciencesAtHome

The New Guinea Singing Dog belongs to one of at least five lineages that split off from the ancestral dog population during the Last Ice Age. (Photo: Nathan Rupert)
29/10/2020

Study of ancient dog DNA traces canine diversity to the Ice Age

post by
Reinout Verbeke

A global study of ancient dog DNA, led by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, University of Oxford, University of Vienna and archaeologists from more than 10 countries, presents evidence that there were different types of dogs more than 11,000 years ago in the period immediately fo

Arkhane, the new species of dinosaurs of the Upper Jurassic (photo: Thierry Hubin / RBINS)
12/10/2020

Will T. rex STAN remain accessible to the public and to science?

post by
Reinout Verbeke

The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences has followed the auction of the skeleton of Tyrannosaurus rex STANTM at Christie's in New York with interest, on October 6th 2020.

The skull of Rhaphicetus (dorsal view and lateral view). (Photo: RBINS)
21/09/2020

18 Million Year Old Sperm Whale With 'Needle-Shaped' Snout

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Paleontologists have excavated and described one of the oldest fossil sperm whales. The new species from Peru is approximately 18 million years old. Rhaphicetus valenciae was about 5 metres long and had an extremely long snout and slender, pointed teeth.

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