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Opgravingen Sint-Romboutskerkhof Mechelen (Foto: Dienst Archeologie - Stad Mechelen)
25/06/2018

Belgium's Largest Collection of Human Remains Reveals Its Secrets

post by
Reinout Verbeke

An anthropologist from our Institute has analyzed 350 human skeletons from a cemetery in Malines, Belgium. The human remains date from the 10th until the 18th century, and are part of the largest skeletal assemblage ever found in Belgium.

The Seatrout is pulled from a sandbank in the turn of Bath (Western Scheldt) by tuggers. © RBINS/SURV
08/06/2018

Aerial Surveys over the North Sea in 2017

post by
Kelle Moreau

A total of 222 flight hours has been performed at sea in the framework of the Belgian North Sea aerial survey programme in 2017. In and nearby the Belgian marine areas 11 spillages were observed, of which 10 operational slicks and 1 accidental spill.

Urbanization puts a great selection pressure on species and could disrupt ecosystems. (Photo: RBINS)
23/05/2018

Urbanization Affects Animal Body Size

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Animals in cities are considerably smaller or larger than species on the countryside, a large study concludes. Co-author Frederik Hendrickx (RBINS): ‘Urbanization puts a great selection pressure on species and could disrupt ecosystems.’

Reconstruction of the 34-million-year-old whale skull from Antarctica - the second-oldest "baleen" whale ever found. (by Carl Buell)
10/05/2018

Ancient Skull Suggests Whales Were Giant Before Baleen Arose

post by
Reinout Verbeke

At least some whales became giants long before the emergence of filter feeding, a 34-million-year-old whale skull suggests.

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig have reconstructed the DNA of five ‘late’ Neandertals, two of them found on Belgian ground. (Photo: Max Planck Institute)
21/03/2018

The Genomes of Five Late Neandertals Provide Insights Into Neandertal History

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig have reconstructed the DNA of five ‘late’ Neandertals, two of them found on Belgian ground.

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