News - Scientific News

Our famous Goyet dog skull, the oldest dog identified to date, is being sampled for DNA analysis. (photo: Reinout Verbeke - RBINS)
14/10/2016

How DNA Reveals Ancient Secrets

post by
Jonas Van Boxel

A Neanderthal bone, a mummified Egyptian cat, a dog from Siberian permafrost, a sturgeon from Roman times or medieval plant remains: their DNA is a fantastic source of information. But the genetic code of these ancient organisms is not easy to crack.

Report marine mammals 2015
13/10/2016

100 Stranded Marine Mammals in Belgium in 2015

post by
Sigrid Maebe

During the last decennia we have been confronted with many strandings of marine mammals. Mostly these concern harbour porpoises or seals, and in very rare cases a larger cetacean. Almost 100 marine mammals stranded on our beaches in 2015.

The beetle species Pogonus chalceus lives in salt marches in Guérande (France). (Photo: RBINS)
03/10/2016

Different Behaviour Leads to New Species

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Two populations of the same species can become separated by natural barriers and evolve into different species over time. That is nothing new.

Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus) (Photo: Cephas, Wikimedia Commons)
16/09/2016

Are We Reintroducing The Wrong Sturgeon Species in Our Waters?

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Using bone fragments found at archaeological sites, researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences have reconstructed the occurrence of sturgeon in the North Sea during the last 7.000 years. It appears that an unexpected sturgeon species was dominant in our region.

 Picture of a Storena formosa specimen with exposure of both 2 flashes and 2 UV lights of 395 nm. (photo: Jonathan Brecko)
26/08/2016

UV Light Reveals Invisible Beauty in Natural History Collections

post by
Jonas Van Boxel

A team from our Institute has studied the use of UV light in the digitization of natural history collections. UV light reveals fluorescent parts of specimens.

Pages

Subscribe to Royal belgian Institute for natural Sciences News
Go to top