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The beetle species Pogonus chalceus lives in salt marches in Guérande (France). (Photo: RBINS)
03/10/2016

Different Behaviour Leads to New Species

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Two populations of the same species can become separated by natural barriers and evolve into different species over time. That is nothing new.

Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus) (Photo: Cephas, Wikimedia Commons)
16/09/2016

Are We Reintroducing The Wrong Sturgeon Species in Our Waters?

post by
Reinout Verbeke

Using bone fragments found at archaeological sites, researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences have reconstructed the occurrence of sturgeon in the North Sea during the last 7.000 years. It appears that an unexpected sturgeon species was dominant in our region.

The Dinosaur Gallery in Street View
12/09/2016

Walk Online Through the Museum of Natural Sciences, Thanks to Google

post by
Charlotte Degueldre

Google together with the Museum of Natural Sciences and some of the most loved natural history institutions in the world, has launched a new online experience, allowing people to come face to face with fascinating specimens and browse through the most spectacular collection of natural his

 Picture of a Storena formosa specimen with exposure of both 2 flashes and 2 UV lights of 395 nm. (photo: Jonathan Brecko)
26/08/2016

UV Light Reveals Invisible Beauty in Natural History Collections

post by
Jonas Van Boxel

A team from our Institute has studied the use of UV light in the digitization of natural history collections. UV light reveals fluorescent parts of specimens.

Fossilized bones found in a coal mine in Gujarat, India. U.S. quarter shown for size. (photo: Johns Hopkins Medicine)
23/08/2016

Discovery of The Most Primitive Primate

post by
Jonas Van Boxel

A cache of exquisitely preserved bones, found in a coal mine in the state of Gujarat, India, appear to be the most primitive primate bones yet discovered. The discovery marks an important chapter in the evolution of primates, mammals which include humans, apes and monkeys.

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